Bet you can lose weight with DietBet

My motivators are not always healthy motivators.

For example, my motivator in my professional life is my want to be successful. I want success. Why is passion for my career unhealthy? Because I often let it take over other aspects of my life. “I’m working” is an often-uttered phrase even when I’m “off the clock.” I manage all things social media at work so I check Facebook and Twitter on a regular basis… when I’m not at work. It’s hard for me to detach.

My motivators to lose weight, eat right and exercise are not clear.

I want to eat right, but I also want to eat French fries.

HomefriesI want to exercise, but I don’t want to spend money on a gym membership, and I have very little desire to work out in my living room.

Index cards with workouts to take to the gym or on a run

I want to lose weight, but it was easier to buy a new pair of jeans instead of melt away the inches that prevent me from buttoning my old jeans.

My healthy motivators are not strong motivators if I can defeat them with cravings, laziness and new jeans.

But there is something that motivates me to accomplish nearly anything…

…and it’s money.

Greed shines in the heart motivated by money, but I guess I can be greedy for weight loss, and DietBet makes it possible.

DietBet is a social dieting game in which players bet they can lose a certain amount of weight within a certain time frame, and players put their money down as commitment. While the website, DietBetter.com, claims that the game isn’t about making money, I’m only attracted to the game because of the opportunity to win big.

There must be a gambler living in my heart.

When I stumbled across DietBet in December by way of a Women’s Health Magazine article: Get Paid to Lose Weight, I immediately wanted to join the game.

Lose weight? Get paid? Um, yes.

The Transformer, the game I considered (and am stilling considering) joining, starts January 7, lasts six months and requires a $25/month bet.

DietBet screenshot

I’m not an impulsive person, which is probably why I’m not a gambler, so I went through all the fine print and made some calculations to see if it was worth the $150 investment. I calculated that the most I could win would be about $132. And that’s before the company takes its percentage. In order to “win big,” other people have to fail at losing weight.

And that made me sad in my heart.

I don’t want to bet that I can lose weight while secretly hoping other people fail so I can make money! Which might be why DietBet isn’t supposed to be about the money. It’s supposed to be about the community.

Looking at the game from the perspective of a social dieting platform, it resembles something like Weight Watchers, and it makes my heart a little less greedy and a lot less sad.

I am still considering joining The Transformer, but my thriftiness and inability to wish failure on others will likely prevail, and I’ll have to find some other motivator stronger than the pull of an unbeatable craving to lose weight.

What are your weight loss motivators? Have you ever participated in a DietBet game? What were your experiences?